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Behaviour and Discipline Policy

Behaviour and Discipline Policy


Genesis 1: 27

"God created man in the image of himself. And so it was that God saw all he had made and indeed it was very good"

 

St Marie’s is a Catholic school and our policy is based on the knowledge that God is present in each member of our school community. We demonstrate respect for each person created by God. Our behaviour policy reflects a positive approach with reconciliation forming a clear and important element. All members of the school community including children staff parents and governors have been consulted regarding this policy.

 

Mission Statement


LEARNING THROUGH FAITH, LOVE AND RESPECT

 

Principles


We aim to create an environment where pupils and staff feel happy, safe and secure.
Every member of the school community is valued, respected and treated fairly and consistently and we foster positive and caring attitudes. 
We promote good relationships so that all can work together with the common purpose of helping everyone achieve their potential. 
We encourage pupils to accept responsibility for their behaviour 
We help children develop a sense of right and wrong 
We make the boundaries of acceptable behaviour clear to everyone.
We maintain a consistent approach to behaviour throughout the school, working closely with parents and carers.

 

Home School Agreement 


The Head teacher asks parents to sign a Home School Agreement when their child joins the school. By signing the Home School Agreement parents will be indicating their agreement with the School Behaviour Policy.

 

Anti Bullying 


The school Anti Bullying Policy includes details of how the school prevents and deals with allegations of bullying

 

St Marie’s School Rules


All school staff, pupils and parents are clear about the behaviour we expect of pupils in school. Our school rules are displayed throughout the school to remind us. Pupils work with their class teacher at the beginning of the school year to establish class rules that are then displayed on the walls in classrooms.

 

All rules are based on the following principle

 

“Treat others as you would like to be treated”

 

  • Show respect and consideration to others at all times.
  • Work hard and try to do your best at all times
  • Be honest.
  • Try to listen and understand other people’s point of view.
  • Let children learn and the teacher teach.
  • Behave sensibly and quietly around the school.
  • Do as an adult asks straight away
  • Respect property and keep the school clean and tidy.
  • Leave chewing gum, and dangerous or illegal items outside school

 

Teaching positive behaviour


At St Marie’s we encourage good behaviour in the following ways. This list is not exhaustive and is updated regularly to ensure that the best solutions are found to promote good behaviour.

 

  • Having clear shared expectations of good behaviour based on respect
  • Religious Education is at the core of all teaching and learning
  • Giving pupils opportunities to feel success and share their achievements during class or assembly time
  • Encouraging pupils to take responsibility for their behaviour
  • Promoting mutual respect through PSHE & assemblies
  • All staff model appropriate behaviour in their relationships with each other and with children
  • Building a partnership with parents or carers.
  • The Daily Act of Collective Worship will often include a focus on appropriate behaviour and actions

 

See appendix 2 for Behaviour Management Techniques

 

Rewarding appropriate behaviour


Giving praise is done thoughtfully so as to be effective. We:

 

  • Smile
  • We look for opportunities to praise pupils
  • Send pupils to show other adults or pupils their achievements and let them hear us talking positively about them to others;
  • Make praise descriptive rather than bland eg “ I like the way you …”
  • Relate the praise to the learning objectives, success criteria or to a pupil’s individual learning targets when praising work.
  • When praising behaviour relate the praise to school or classroom rules or the pupil’s own behaviour targets.
  • We give team points, stickers stars and badges
  • We report excellent behaviour to parents through the daily planner

 

Teams


There is a team system across the school
All children are placed in a team or house 
Infants - Red, yellow blue green 
Juniors - Arrowsmith, Clitherow, Rigby, Ward

 

Good behaviour, good work etc is rewarded with a star (a stamp is used) using the class system or a good mark in the planner 


At the Golden Book Assembly on Friday the team with the most points is acknowledged with a star/ shield on the hall display.


At the end of each year the marks are added up and the winning team has a reward

 

Golden Book


Each week one or two children are chosen by the class teacher for inclusion in the Golden Book.

 

They receive a golden sticker; their name is displayed in the Golden Book and on the newsletter. The following Friday these children can sit on Top Table with a friend and they have an extra turn on the Activity Trail 

 

Managing inappropriate behaviour


Pupils often behave badly because they are upset, which makes them feel lonely. Acknowledging a pupil’s feelings breaks through the loneliness and makes the pupil feel cared for and less likely to seek attention inappropriately. We:

 

  • Always remain calm and objective
  • Anticipate behaviour and try to prevent it from occurring
  • Make the distinction between the behaviour and the pupil.
  • We always acknowledge that children are good (see the reference at the beginning of this policy). Children are never “naughty” We say ‘that was a silly thing to do’ rather than ‘you are silly’.
  • Try to ascertain the root cause of the problem and talk to the pupils individually without an audience
  • Communicate empathy by reflecting their viewpoint back so as to defuse the situation
  • Discuss the consequences of their actions and give pupils choices. Help them to realise that they are in control and can bring about a change
  • Avoid nagging and lecturing as it feeds pupils who are hungry for adult attention
  • Apologise when we make mistakes
  • Use Restorative Justice techniques & conferences in resolving issues where there has been a victim or victims – see appendix and Anti Bullying Policy

 

Age Appropriate Strategies

 

Foundation Stage


Challenging behaviour at this age is usually to do with distress, not understanding routines and lack of experience of a school setting. The following strategies are therefore based on being positive and supportive and ensuring safety. We:

 

  • Offer appropriate activities to match the needs of pupils & providing a choice of experiences
  • Ensure there is space and time to calm down & a space to sit for time-out
  • Form positive relationships with parents and carers
  • Involve other members of the school staff or outside agencies such as Sure Start, Gateway Team, the School Link Teacher (TESS) and the Educational Psychology Service

 

KS1


Strategies are as positive as possible remembering that these children are unused to having to be responsible in a large group. We:

 

  • Use positive praise reinforcement and role-modelling
  • Discuss pupils’ behaviour with them and encourage them to apologise to others who have been hurt or upset
  • Move pupils away from other members of the class if they are not concentrating or they are disturbing others
  • Apply sanctions such as missing some or all of a playtime
  • Organise for pupils to spend time in another class if they continue to disrupt others
  • Set-up a behaviour contract, plan or chart & involve the SMT
  • Speak to parents about their child’s behaviour.

 

KS2


As the pupils get older expectations of them taking responsibility for their behaviour and understanding the consequences increase. Our expectations of the oldest pupils in the school are very high. If there are pupils who have consistently found it difficult to manage their behaviour it is important that information is passed on regarding triggers, successful strategies and past involvement of parents or outside agencies. In addition to the strategies above, we:

 

  • Talk quietly to the pupil and reinforce expectations of behaviour and the consequences of behaving badly
  • Are aware and sensitive, anticipating difficulties and dealing with them before they escalate
  • Use successful strategies from previous years as appropriate
  • Discuss pupils’ behaviour with them and place the emphasis on pupils taking an active role in finding solutions and changing behaviour.

 

Partnership with parents


We believe that by creating a positive relationship with all our parents and carers we can all work together to reinforce good behaviour and provide solutions to inappropriate behaviour.

 

Parents will be informed of misdemeanours firstly through a note in the daily planner 
If the situation is more serious a note will be sent asking the parents to come in to school to speak confidentially with the teacher – usually in the meeting room


In more serious situations or where a behaviour is repeated the Headteacher and teacher will meet with the parents/ carers to discuss future actions

 

Minor, intermediate and major incidents


At school there is a hierarchy of sanctions for dealing with minor, intermediate or major incidents. Minor incidents become more serious through repetition. It is important there are small sanctions for minor incidents as this reinforces the certainty of consequences for behaving unacceptably.

 

The following is a guide.

 

Minor incidents

  • pushing in
  • interrupting the teacher
  • attention seeking
  • clowning around
  • spoiling games
  • avoiding work
  • time wasting
  • teasing
  • being noisy
  • running inside
  • arguing
  • swearing (accidentally)
  • cheekiness
  • wearing jewellery or inappropriate hairstyles
  • carrying unauthorised items such as toys, sweets or money
  • throwing small things in class or outside
  • Carrying other children or picking up younger children

More serious incidents

  • repeated minor incidents
  • interfering with other pupils’ work
  • arguing back
  • rudeness
  • name calling
  • using God’s name inappropriately
  • telling lies
  • graffiti
  • spitting
  • refusal to follow instructions
  • swearing (with intent)
  • leaving the room without permission
  • Play fighting
  • Rough or aggressive play eg wrestling
  • deliberately upsetting others or excluding from games

Major incidents

  • fighting
  • vicious kicking
  • hitting back
  • throwing dangerous objects
  • persistent lying
  • vandalism
  • swearing at staff
  • verbal abuse of staff
  • physical abuse of staff
  • stealing
  • running out of school
  • bullying
  • racist incidents
  • bringing dangerous items onto school premises

 

Minor incidents


Minor disruption is behaviour that makes teaching and class management difficult e.g. pupils chatting, calling out or not listening.These are dealt with by the adult/s present at the time, who will:

 

  • Discuss the incident with the pupil or pupils involved, ask pupils to stop the bad behaviour and explain what they are expected to do
  • Encourage pupils to resolve differences themselves and insist that they take responsibility for their behaviour
  • Apply sanctions, if appropriate, such as missing part of a playtime or moving away from peers.
  • Parents are not usually informed at this stage unless there is a repetition of the incident. 

 

More serious incidents


Serious disruption is behaviour that makes it impossible to carry on teaching or continue the normal running of the class eg pupils refuse to carry out an instruction, throw things, hurt other pupils or adults, make loud noises.

 

The incident may be dealt with by the class teacher but an SMT member or an external agency e.g. TESS teacher or Gateway team can be called in to support. We may:

 

  • Apply appropriate sanctions such as missing a playtime or exclusion from a class treat
  • Organise for the pupil to spend time in another class
  • Begin monitoring the pupil’s behaviour using the class record book
  • Discuss the incident with the pupil’s parents
  • Set up a behaviour contract, chart or plan – a member of SMT will be involved

 

Major incidents


Major incidents are dealt with alongside the SLT. The Head teacher will speak with parents and together we will all decide on appropriate further action.

 

Inappropriate behaviour in class 


All teachers, Teaching Assistants and other paid staff with responsibility for pupils can impose reasonable sanctions in response to poor behaviour. 


It is the responsibility of class teachers to ensure that the school rules are enforced in their classes and that their classes behave in a responsible manner during lesson time for all adults including HLTA, TAs, PPA providers and supply teachers 


Staff treat all children with respect and understanding and fairness.


If a child misbehaves in class the following procedure is followed.

 

In Foundation Stage and KS 1

 

  1. The “look” as a reminder
  2. A verbal reminder of expected behaviour.
  3. A positive choice given to improve behaviour
  4. “Time out” as appropriate for the misbehaviour or loss of playtime. This is spent in class supervised by a Teacher; children use a clock or sand timer to record the time. The teacher records the sanction in class record book
  5. If minor disruption becomes a regular occurrence the teacher will speak confidentially to the parents or carer at the end of the day. Staff, the child and parent/carer will work together and monitor the behaviour. Regular verbal feedback will be given to parents.
  6. If school based strategies fail to have a lasting impact, outside agencies are called in to support the child, school and family.
  7. If there is no improvement the Headteacher will be informed if the class teacher is concerned about the level of inappropriate behaviour or if behaviour is repeated.
    The Headteacher and class teacher will discuss further strategies and the Headteacher will speak with the child.
  8. The teacher or Headteacher contacts parents and discusses pupil’s behaviour. Appropriate action decided upon e.g. positive discipline programme involving child, parents and teachers working together with regular reviews.
  9. If appropriate the Chair of Governors is informed. Consideration of involvement of outside agencies e.g. Behaviour Support Team, Primary Child Mental Health Team, Educational Psychologist.
  10. Possible fixed term exclusion.
  11. Governing Body is informed
  12. School follows DfE guidelines for permanent exclusion

 

On occasion the level of behaviour may mean that a more severe sanction is required without following all the steps

 

In Key Stage 2

 

  1. A “look”
  2. A verbal reminder of acceptable behaviour
  3. A positive choice given to improve behaviour
  4. Final verbal reminder Teacher may write name on the board as a visual reminder – this may be removed if behaviour improves
  5. The pupil loses playtime (e.g. 1 –15 mins). This is spent in class supervised by a Teacher; children use a clock or sand timer to record the time. The teacher records the sanction in the class record book
  6. If behaviour does not improve - Child misses the privilege of playtime or dinnertime play the child will be writing or drawing, depending on the ability of the child, about the behaviour expected in our school. In the afternoon where this sanction cannot take place parents/carers will be informed in the diary of the step reached and the sanction may be applied the following day.
  7. In Key Stage 2 after the above 1 bad mark given – to be recorded in planner by teacher (with explanation if necessary) Teaching Assistants tell the Class Teacher who will record the bad mark.
  8. In KS2 pupils lose the privilege of working and playing with their class for an appropriate period of time – supervised by HT or other staff. Pupils may also lose other privileges such as attendance at after school clubs and events, representing the school on occasions and on residential visits
  9. The teacher informs the Headteacher who will speak to the child about the incident/s. There is an opportunity for the child to reflect on their behaviour and how to show they are sorry.
  10. The teacher or Headteacher contacts parents and discusses pupil’s behaviour. Appropriate action decided upon e.g. positive discipline programme involving child, parents and teachers working together with regular reviews.
  11. If appropriate the Chair of Governors is informed. Consideration of involvement of outside agencies e.g. Behaviour Support Team, Primary Child Mental Health Team, Educational Psychologist.
  12. Possible fixed term exclusion.
  13. Governing Body is informed

 

School follows DfE guidelines for permanent exclusion 


On occasion the level of behaviour may mean that a more severe sanction is required without following all the steps

 

The role of Teaching Assistants 


Teaching Assistants often work outside the classrooms with small groups or individuals or during PPA time. They will follow these procedures

 

  1. A “look”
  2. A verbal reminder of acceptable behaviour
  3. A positive choice given to improve behaviour
  4. Teaching Assistant writes name on the board – this may be removed if behaviour improves.
  5. If name appears twice on the board then the pupil loses 1-15mins of playtime. This is spent in the classroom supervised by the Teaching Assistant. Children use a clock or sand timer to record the time. TA records this in class record book and copied to School Behaviour record
  6. If behaviour does not improve -Child misses the privilege of playtime or dinnertime play and spends the time writing or drawing, depending on the ability of the child, about the behaviour expected in our school. In the afternoon where this sanction cannot take place parents/carers will be informed in the diary of the step reached and the sanction may be applied the following day by the teacher.
  7. If poor behaviour persists the child will be returned to class for the teacher to give an appropriate sanction or in KS2 a bad mark and continue the above steps. (During PPA time the deputy or Head Teacher will be involved)

 

The following procedures are in place in the outdoor environment including morning playtime and lunchtimes


All adults including Teachers, Teaching Assistants, Welfare Assistants External providers and volunteers treat all children with respect and understanding and fairness.


All sanctions are proportionate to the transgression.


Injured or distressed children must be accompanied inside by an adult


Staff should not deal with incidents concerning their own children or relations

 

Rules for playtimes and outdoor activities are displayed in classrooms and on the playground. 
These are

  • We look after each other and play safely.
  • We follow instructions straight away.
  • We show respect for people, property and the environment.
  • We ask children on their own to join in with our games.
  • We say sorry if we hurt or bump into anyone by accident.
  • We stop and stand still when we hear the whistle.
  • We take care of our equipment.

 

Rewards will be: 


Proportionate to the achievement (small rewards leading to more complex / valuable ones)

  • A smile
  • Positive comments
  • Praise Stickers
  • Top Cat certificate
  • Reporting good behaviour to teachers
  • Good marks using the sticker system

 

Sanctions


Any pupil who contravenes the rules will be subject to the following sanctions

  1. A “Look”
  2. A verbal reminder of appropriate behaviour
  3. Present a final positive choice e.g. play nicely or leave the game
  4. Standing/walking with the member of staff for up to 5 minutes
  5. “Time out” of 1, 2 or 5 minutes on the terrace where they can be supervised –recorded in staff individual behaviour book
  6. Name in the incident book and taken into school and reported to the senior member of staff on duty. Sanction will be given by this member of staff 

 

Dealing with incidents during playtimes

 

Minor, intermediate and major incidents


The following is a guide to incidents which may occur in the outdoor environment. The list is not exhaustive and there may be other behaviour adults will use their professional judgment

 

Minor incidents

  • pushing in
  • attention seeking
  • clowning around
  • spoiling games
  • teasing
  • being noisy
  • arguing
  • swearing (accidentally)
  • cheekiness
  • carrying unauthorised items such as toys, sweets or money
  • Carrying other children or picking up younger children

More serious incidents

  • repeated minor incidents
  • Play fighting
  • Rough or aggressive play eg wrestling
  • deliberately upsetting others or excluding from games
  • Throwing objects dangerously
  • arguing back
  • rudeness
  • name calling
  • using God’s name inappropriately
  • telling lies
  • spitting
  • refusal to follow instructions
  • swearing (with intent)

Major incidents

  • fighting
  • vicious kicking
  • hitting back
  • throwing dangerous objects
  • persistent lying
  • extortion
  • vandalism
  • swearing at staff
  • verbal abuse of staff
  • physical abuse of staff
  • stealing
  • running out of school
  • bullying
  • racist incidents
  • bringing dangerous items onto school premises.

 

Reporting of incidents by Welfare Staff


Minor incidents will be dealt with by the member of staff on the playground and any sanctions will be recorded by the staff.

 

More serious incidents, depending on the circumstances, need to be reported to the class teacher/senior leadership team and written in the class/school incident book. The report must be given by the welfare assistant who dealt with the incident in the first instance to ensure an accurate account is provided. 


Major incidents e.g. fighting must result in the children being brought into school and a senior member of staff informed. This will be reported in the School Incident book with a record of action taken.

 

Application of sanctions 


All adults in school are aware that every child is unique and that inappropriate behaviour takes many forms. The above procedure will be carried out wherever it is appropriate. However on occasion the level of behaviour may mean that a more severe sanction is required without following all the steps.

Children with Individual Behaviour Plans may need to be dealt with in a different manner as detailed on their plan. See later

 

Children with SEN or EAL may not fully understand what is expected or be able to explain their actions. Staff need to take this into consideration when applying sanctions

Rights and responsibilities agreed after consultation with all parties

 

Pupils rights Pupils responsibilities
  • To be treated with respect
  • To be safe
  • To learn
  • To be listened to
  • To be happy in school
  • To practice their faith
  • To show respect and courtesy towards everyone
  • To take responsibility for their behaviour.
  • To work hard and be willing to learn
  • To allow others to learn
  • To cooperate with adults and children and follow instructions
  • To do their best
School and staff rights School and staff responsibilities
  • To enforce the school behaviour policy
  • To be treated with respect and courtesy
  • To teach without disruption or intrusion
  • To be happy
  • To be safe
  • To be supported by parents in maintaining an orderly climate for learning
  • Not to tolerate violence, threatening behaviour or abuse
  • To ask parents to sign the Home School Agreement
  • To promote Christian values in accordance with the school Mission Statement
  • To communicate clearly measures to ensure good order, respect and discipline
  • To treat children and adults with respect
  • To be a positive role model
  • To let every pupil achieve their potential
  • To be prepared for work
  • To create a safe and secure environment for learning
  • To foster positive relationships with parents and carers
Parents rights Parents responsibilities
  • That children are treated fairly and with consistency
  • To expect children are safe, secure and respected
  • To have any complaint about behaviour or bullying taken seriously by the school and investigated/resolved as necessary
  • To be kept informed about their child’s progress including behaviour
  • To encourage their children to show respect and support the school’s authority to discipline its pupils
  • To ensure their child is well- behaved in school by following reasonable instructions and adhering to the school rules
  • To send their child to school each day punctually, suitably clothed, fed, rested and equipped ready to learn
  • To ensure staff are aware of any SEN- related or other factors which may affect their child’s behaviour
  • To support children at home
  • To keep the principles in the home-school agreement

 

Behaviour beyond the school gate

 

All pupils are expected to behave in a manner which does not threaten the health and safety of other pupils, staff or members of the general public. This includes the journey to and from school, on educational visits and the acceptable use of the Internet, digital recording devices and mobile phones 

 

Any non criminal bad behaviour and bullying which is witnessed by a staff member or reported to school will result in the sanctions in the school policy being implemented. All criminal behaviour will be reported to the police.

 

Subject to the school’s behaviour policy, the teacher may discipline a pupil for: 
Any misbehaviour when the child is:

 

  • taking part in any school-organised or school-related activity or
  • travelling to or from school or
  • wearing school uniform or
  • in some other way identifiable as a pupil at the school.

 

Or misbehaviour at any time, whether or not the conditions above apply, that:

 

  • could have repercussions for the orderly running of the school or
  • poses a threat to another pupil or member of the public or
  • could adversely affect the reputation of the school.

 

Behaviour during activities provided by external agencies and volunteers 


Guidelines based on the above principles and practice are issued to all external providers

 

Support available for pupils whose behaviour indicates significant problems 

 

Support is available for any pupil in the form of

 

  • A Pastoral Support Plan. (PSP)This will be initiated if a pupil is at risk of exclusion.
  • An Early Help Meeting may also be considered in these circumstances.
  • A fixed term exclusion,
  • support from outside agencies,
  • Reduced Timetable,
  • A place at a Pupil Support Centre

 

Additional support 

 

The school SEN procedure can provide additional support for parents and pupils who have social emotional and behavioural needs. 


If necessary, pupils will be offered support through the use Nurture and SEAL. An individual behaviour plan may be produced by the class teacher and reviewed every half term. Parents are kept informed at every stage of the process. 

 

For pupils with more significant difficulties, the school will work in partnership with outside agencies e.g. Behaviour Support Team, the Educational Psychology Service and Gateway Services.
The school may also consider the involvement of the school nurse, other health services and social care.

 

The local Standish and Aspull Children’s Centre and Parent Support Adviser may be able to offer further support.

 

Reasonable adjustments to the rewards, sanctions and teaching strategies within this policy will be considered dependent on the individual circumstances of each child. All staff will be made aware of the adjustments to be made.

 

Exclusion

 

We do not wish to exclude any child from school, but sometimes this may be necessary. The school has therefore adopted the standard national list of reasons for exclusion, set out in the school discipline chapter of Education and Inspection Act 2006 and the revised guidance on the education of children and young people with behavioural, emotional and social difficulties (2008). We refer to this guidance in any decision to exclude a child from school.

 

Only the Headteacher (or a member of the SLT acting on behalf of the Headteacher) has the power to exclude a child from school. The Headteacher will take into account all the circumstances, the evidence available ad the need to balance the interests of the pupils against those of the whole school community. 

 

The Headteacher may exclude a child for one or more fixed periods, for up to 45 days in any one school year. In extreme and exceptional circumstances the Headteacher may exclude a child permanently. It is also possible for the Headteacher to convert fixed-term exclusion into a permanent exclusion, if the circumstances warrant this. 

 

If the Headteacher excludes a child the parents will be informed immediately, giving reasons for the exclusion. At the same time, the Headteacher makes it clear to the parents that they can, if they wish, appeal against the decision to the Governing Body. The school informs the parents how to make any such appeal.

 

The Headteacher informs the LA and the governing body about any permanent exclusion, and about any fixed term exclusions beyond five days in any one term. 

 

School is under a duty to provide suitable full-time education for the excluded pupil from the sixth school day of any fixed period exclusion of more than 5 consecutive school days. The Local Authority is under a duty to provide suitable full-time education from the sixth school day of a permanent exclusion.

 

The Governing Body itself cannot either exclude a child or extend the exclusion period made by the Headteacher.

 

The Governing Body has a discipline committee which is made up of between three and five members. This committee considers any exclusion appeals on behalf of the governors.

 

When an appeals panel meets to consider exclusion, they consider the circumstances in which the child was excluded, consider any representation by parents and the LA and consider whether the child should be reinstated.

 

If the governors’ appeal panel decides that a child should be reinstated, the Headteacher must comply with this ruling.

 

Detention

 

Detention – Teachers, Teaching Assistants and other paid staff may withdraw the privilege of playtime and lunchtime play and may detain pupils. The school is not required to give parents or carers prior notice of this. Parents and carers can inform school if the detention will cause the family a particular problem but cannot over-rule the school’s decision.

 

Searching pupils and their possessions

 

Searching pupils – school staff can search pupils with their consent for any item which is banned by the school rules

 

The Headteacher and staff authorised by the Headteacher have the power to search pupils or their possessions without consent, where they suspect the pupil has weapons, alcohol, illegal drugs and stolen items.

 

If a pupil refuses to be searched the police will be called

 

Confiscation, Retention and Disposal

 

Confiscation – Staff may confiscate items such as mobile phones and sharp objects if they are deemed inappropriate. If safe to do so these items will be returned to the child or their parents or carer at the end of the day.

 

Retention or disposal of a pupil’s property- inappropriate items such as knives, cigarettes and any item which may be used to commit an offence and items banned under school rules will be retained and disposed of safely

 

Staff development 

 

All staff attend whole school INSET annually to review this policy and other relevant polices e.g. Child Protection, Safeguarding, Anti Bullying etc. 

 

LA professionals provide INSET as required and staff needs are identified through the annual professional development interview or Performance Management cycle. The PSHE/C Coordinator attends network meetings and disseminates information to staff. The SENCO or other members of staff also provide training. All staff are provided with “Team Teach” training

 

Use of Force to control or restrain pupils

 

All members of staff are aware of the regulations regarding the use of positive handling and physical intervention, as set out in the school discipline chapter of Education and Inspection Act 2006 and the Revised Guidance on the education of children and young people with behavioural, emotional and social difficulties (2008), and Ensuring Good Behaviour in Schools (2011) Staff will be updated of any changes made by the government relating to the Use of Force

All School staff have the power to use reasonable force 

 

Staff only intervene physically to control or restrain children to prevent injury to a child/children, or if a child is in danger of hurting him/herself or others, or of causing damage to the property of any person, or from causing disorder e.g. teachers will physically separate pupils found fighting or that if a pupil refuses to leave a room when instructed to do so they will be physically removed
The actions of staff will always be in the best interest of the child and are in line with government guidelines on the Use of Force. force (Ref ISBN 978-1-84775-751-7 ) Under no circumstances will physical force or restraint be used as a form of punishment.

 

Where it is felt that there a child may need to be restrained a positive handling plan will be written and shared with relevant staff and parents.

 

Drug and alcohol abuse

 

It is the policy of this school that no child should bring any drug, legal or illegal, to school. If a child will need medication during the school day the parent or guardian should notify the school and ask permission for the medication to be brought. This should be taken directly to the school office for safekeeping. Any medication needed by a child while in school must be taken under the supervision of a teacher or other adult worker.

 

The school will take very seriously misuse of any substances such as glue, other solvents or alcohol. The parents or guardians of any child involved will always be notified. Any child who deliberately brings substances into school for the purpose of misuse will be punished by a fixed-term exclusion. If the offence is repeated, the child will be permanently excluded, and the police and social services will be informed.

 

If any child is found to be suffering from the effects of alcohol or other substances, arrangements will be made for that child to be taken home. It is forbidden for anyone, adult or child, to bring onto the school premises any illegal drugs. Any child who is found to have brought to school any type of illegal substance will be punished by a temporary exclusion. The child will be re-admitted to the school following the fixed term. A parent or guardian of the child will also need to visit the school and discuss the seriousness of the incident with the head teacher. Social services may be involved if deemed appropriate by the Designated Child Protection Officer.

 

If the offence is repeated the child will be permanently excluded.

 

If a child is found to have deliberately brought illegal substances into school, and is found to be distributing these to other pupils for money, the child will be permanently excluded from the school, Wigan CYPS, the police and social services will also be informed.

 

Dealing with allegations of abuse against teachers and other staff
[new - see guidance July 2011 www.wiganlscb.com]

  • Whilst all allegations of abuse must be taken seriously, the quick resolution of that allegation will be a clear priority to the benefit of all concerned
  • In response to an allegation, staff suspension will not be the default option. An individual will only be suspended if there is no reasonable alternative
  • Allegations that are found to have been malicious will be removed from personnel records and any that are not substantiated, are unfounded or malicious will not be referred to in employer references
  • Pupils that are found to have made malicious allegations are likely to have breached the school behaviour policy. The school will therefore consider whether to apply an appropriate sanction, which could include temporary or permanent exclusion (as well as referral to the police if there are grounds for believing a criminal offence may have been committed)
  • All allegations should be reported straight away, normally to the head teacher or in the absence of the head teacher, or in cases where the head teacher is the subject of the allegation or concern to the chair of governors.
  • The local authority designated officer (LADO) is also responsible for providing advice and monitoring cases.

 

Monitoring and Review

 

The Headteacher monitors the effectiveness of this policy each term and reports to the Governing Body on the effectiveness of the policy and if necessary makes recommendations for further improvements.

 

Rewards and Sanctions are monitored termly by the Head teacher and Deputy

A copy of this policy is available on the website. The policy is given in full to all new parents of children starting St Marie’s School. A paper copy is available to all who request it. Reminders are issued at the beginning of each school year.

 

The school and the governing body will seek to ensure that no child is treated unfairly because of faith, race or ethnic background, gender or disability.

 

The governing body reviews this policy every year. The governors may, however, review the policy earlier than this if the government introduces new regulations, or if the governing body receives recommendations on how the policy might be improved.

 

Reference should be made to the school’s policies including: Learning and Teaching, Anti-bullying,

 

Cyber bullying

 

Reviewed & adopted: October 2016

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